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Primula Cheese and the NSPCC team up with children’s authors to help kids to dream big

Children’s authors have backed the Primula Cheese and NSPCC campaign to help kids stay safe from abuse and dream big things for their future.

Authors including Philip Ardagh and Cathy Cassidy have added their voices to the campaign, sharing their childhood aspirations and illustrating the importance of young people growing up in a safe and secure environment where their minds can run free.

In the next few weeks Primula Cheese will start donating 20% of the profits from their limited edition branded tubes directly to the NSPCC, which will help the charity in its work to protect young people from abuse and neglect and to help victims recover.

Peter Wanless, Chief Executive of the NSPCC, said, “Every child is born with hopes for the future but if their head is full of fear, anxiety or loneliness these thoughts can get shunted to the one side.

“Childhood should be a time when we’re free to dream big. Abuse can destroy that, which is why we are so thankful for the support of Primula Cheese in helping us towards our goal of keeping five million more children safe by 2021.

“Having young people’s authors also back the campaign and share their childhood aspirations reinforces the importance of our work in safeguarding as many childhoods as possible.”

Becoming a writer now ranks significantly higher than ten years ago in a list of dream jobs for children in the UK; alongside pop star, doctor and police officer, according to a survey by the NSPCC.

Reading and writing for pleasure can change lives and shape dreams while allowing children to explore their imagination and understanding of the world, a luxury that children who suffer abuse are not able to enjoy.

Below are a few of the author’s recollections of how they used to think when they were young:

  1. “I was really saddened to hear that 1 in 20 children suffer from abuse in the UK. No child should have to suffer the fear or anxiety this brings. I was a big dreamer as child – and I am still a firm believer in the power of dreams! My biggest dream has always been to be ‘a writer and an artist’. I got halfway there, which is pretty cool!” Cathy Cassidy (Shine on Daizy Star, Cherry Crush)
  2. “Well, when I was a small boy I wanted to be a cat burglar; it seemed exciting and glamorous. Then I realized it’s not a real job. After that I had no idea what I wanted to be, no one ever made any suggestions at all. I wish they had. I was so lucky that I had the freedom to imagine what I would be when I grew up!” Marcus Sedgwick (Midwinterblood, My Swordhand is Singing, Revolver)
  3. “I didn’t really have many dreams when I was a child. I started having ambitions when I started reading for pleasure – that made me want to go to the countries I’d read about or do the things characters had done in the books I loved. Having the time to read and dream as a young adult is so important.” Tom Palmer (Football Academy)
  4. “When I was young I dreamed of becoming a rock star, but ended up an international children’s author! Seven times down, eight times up – this is the lesson my hero Jack learns in Young Samurai and it is the same lesson that took me from a child writing in my back garden to an adult writing for millions of children. And it is my lesson to you: never give up on your dreams!” Chris Bradford (Young Samurai, Bodyguard)
  5. “When I was young, I dreamed of being an author. I didn’t know you could earn a living writing books. But, now I’ve grown up, that’s exactly what I do. My dream came true! ” Philip Ardagh (The Grunts, The Eddie Dickens Trilogy)
  6. “I dreamed of being a writer when I was an ordinary Tyneside boy. I imagined books with my name on them standing on our local library shelves. I wrote because I enjoyed it. And I kept on writing and reading as I grew up. Whatever you want to be, you must first of all be yourself. It is so important for young people to be afforded the freedom to work hard, play hard and dream big.” David Almond (Skellig, My Name is Mina)
  7. When I was a kid, I wanted to be a spy or a detective. I found that as I read a wider range of books, my ambitions changed. I dreamed about becoming a deep sea diver, astronaut, vet, writer, and–still–a detective! Andrea Beaty (Iggy Peck, Architect & Ava Twist, Scientist)

Paul Lewney, managing director of Kavli UK which produces Primula Cheese, said: “Charity is very much at the heart of Primula’s work and we are delighted to be working with the NSPCC in 2017. Philanthropy is in our company DNA and really is our reason for being, we are owned by the Kavli Trust, which means we continually donate to charities throughout the year.

We really believe that all children in the UK should have the right to a safe and happy childhood, but sadly for some this is not the case. The NSPCC carries out fantastic work which allows children to be children and that really is at the heart of this campaign”

Primula Cheese is owned by the Kavli Trust, meaning its profits already go to charities and good causes. This 20% of profits donated to the NSPCC will be in addition to the money already given to charities through the Kavli Trust.

The limited edition NSPCC Primula Tubes will start appearing on shelves in Asda, Morrison’s, Tesco and Sainsbury’s stores, and selected smaller independent stores from Monday 27 February 2017.

For more details please visit www.primula.co.uk/NSPCC